A Look Back: The Fourth Six Months

Today marks two years in Moldova! I almost can’t believe it! In some ways, it seems like just yesterday that I was getting off the plane in Chisinau and taking my first steps on Moldovan soil, while in other ways it seems like a long time ago. This last quarter of my time here has been filled with its share of both ups and downs. According to the “cycle of vulnerability” as a Peace Corps volunteer, this is apparently quite normal. I still a little over one month left here, but I’m sure that time is going to pass quickly. The past 6 months have been a whirlwind of emotions, both excitement that I’ll soon be returning home, eating American food, and spending time with my friends and family, and sadness that I’ll be leaving this beautiful country and its wonderful people behind. In particular, I’ll miss the abundance of fresh fruit and veggies in the summer months, the sunflower fields that stretch on forever, my host family, my teaching partners, and my students. I know it’s almost time to move on to the next chapter of my life, but it is definitely bittersweet. Anyway, here is the recap of my fourth six months in Moldova (you can find the recap of the first six months here, the second six months here, and the third six months here).

Month 19: December.

At the beginning of the month, I accompanied the dance ensemble from my village to an international talent competition in the capital, spending the day with my students and their dance instructors. I observed a Russian lesson with 8th grade students and didn’t understand a word. In English Club, we did a US state poster project, which the students got really into. We had some gorgeous sunsets, as well as our first light snowfall. We celebrated Sfantul Andrei, and I attended a Christmas/New Year concert, also with the dance ensemble, in our raion center, and spent a morning in the capital with my host mom and her friend, Natasha. I spent Christmas at home in upstate New York with my family, with two weeks packed with holidays, celebrations, and spending time with family and friends.

Month 20: January.

The month started off at home in the US, skiing and hanging out with my grandparents, family, and friends. The trip back to Moldova was a bit of a terrible adventure, when I got stuck in the JFK airport for over 24 hours. Celebrated Moldovan Christmas at home with my host family, and welcomed carolers and seed-throwing kids to welcome in the New Year. One of my 8th grade classes sang Happy Birthday to me on the first day back to school.  Celebrated Mihai Eminescu Day outside in freezing temperatures. Went with one of my partner teachers to meet a man who is bed-ridden and who really wanted to meet the “American” in the village, had a really great conversation with him. Had our first heavy snowfall, and even a snow day! Was ambushed by some neighborhood kids by snowfalls and fistfuls of snow. Lost power and spent a night in candlelight. Had our COS (close of service) lottery and found out when I’d be going home.

Month 21: February.

The snow started to melt a little. Celebrated English Week at school and taught an open lesson with my partner teacher. Wore my hair down to school for the first time and got lots of compliments. Attended a 100 Days celebration with 1st grade students and stayed for a masa afterwards. Attended my host cousin’s wedding, and danced with my host nieces. Accompanied two students and my site mate to a GLOW mini-camp in the capital. Every student in one of my 8th grade classes did their homework (a first!). Kicked off Peace Corps Week with a mini “International Film Festival” with our students, showing short videos made by volunteers from all over the world. Spent much of the month relaxing and hanging out at home.

Month 22: March.

We continued Peace Corps Week with a video-chat with a class in the United States and inviting several other Peace Corps volunteers to come speak to our students about where and what home is to them. Both events were a big success! We celebrated Martisor, as well as International Women’s Day both at school and in the community with a big concert. Had “control” or an audit at school and helped my partner teachers prepare food for the guests one day. The first flowers started showing up in the garden, and we celebrated my host mom’s birthday.

Month 23: April.

The village prepared for Easter, and students got out of lessons early one day to do a village clean-up. We celebrated Easter by going to church early in the morning and then eating and sleeping the rest of the day. My host niece, Valerica, visited and we spent a lot of time playing together. Ate cake for Valerica’s 8th birthday. We celebrated Memorial Easter (in memory of loved ones who have passed) at the cemetery and at our house with a meal after. The flowers began to bloom in full force, and the fruit trees blossomed. Met with the Parent’s Association to make plans for a summer day camp, and got their approval! Went to my partner teacher Liuba’s birthday party, and had a lot of fun.

Month 24: May.

Started off the month at our COS (close of service) conference with my fellow volunteers. Victory Day was celebrated in my village with a short ceremony at the World War II monument and students and community members placed flowers around the monument. Ate the first strawberries of the year, and picked cherries. Had an “American masa” with my English Club to thank them for coming so regularly throughout the past two years- we ate a lot of yummy American foods. Attended Peace Corps Moldova’s 25th anniversary celebration along with my partners and school director. Had my last lessons with my students and celebrated Last Bell, the celebration that marks the end of the school year, and further celebrated with a barbecue in the woods with my fellow teachers.

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